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sewing

sewing

Baby-Girl6 Soccer-Boys3 Baby-Girl7 Soccer-Boys Baby-Girl1 Snow Baby-Girl2 Socer-Boys2

Emma-Tunic Baby-girl8 Baby-Girl5

Joining Ginny for Yarn Along

Sun, snow, sun, snow. The ever changing cycles of this time of year, as spring and winter dance together. I love the randomness it of it all. In just a few short months we will go from talking about this crazy winter, to wondering when the heat will break and give way to cooler weather. Spring offers change, every day, and in just an unpredictable way. Tomorrow we are due to see snow, but come soccer game time on Saturday, it should be near 70.

Speaking of soccer, good gracious are we seeing a lot of that. My older two love the sport, and I am just thrilled beyond belief that they chose something that is only 50 minutes in length, and played in the cooler months. Most days I have to scoot the boys outside to get the ball out of the house and away from the dog, furniture and baby. I feel like it is constantly bouncing off of one of their feet, and almost everything we own can somehow become a makeshift goal if needed. One of my kids has practice at least once a day and games most weekends, which means that I am  becoming entrenched in my minivan driving, soccer mom chauffeuring ways. Perhaps Landon will do theater, dance, or play a musical instrument. Those can’t be anywhere as drive intensive as youth sports.

Of course I have Emma Jeanne and my knitting to keep me company on the sidelines (Landon is always off schmoozing the preschool ladies on the swings), and I do believe that more yarn related projects get completed on the field than anywhere else throughout the year. During yesterdays practice I managed to get Emma’s Diamond Pullover and a new pair of Picky Pants off the needle. Both projects had sat with just one or two rows left to complete for months, and for some reason I could not find the motivation to get them done. I knew the sweater was a tad big for Emma Jeanne, so maybe I just felt that there wasn’t a rush to get it on her. I have to say that I was surprised by how much I enjoyed knitting with this yarn, and how well I think that it is holding up. I have an Emma Tunic on the needles again (I love that pattern), and I am making it in the same fiber and colorway. There hasn’t been any piling, and it holds its shape beautifully.

With two kids on the field, one making a bee line for the playground, and one so very close to learning to crawl all over the place, trying to keep my knitting in order can be a challenge some days. Having a small drawstring bag to help me keep my yarn from tangling, or even worse, getting dirt and baby puffs in it, is a lifesaver. I use these bags two different ways, and carry them with me wherever just to be sure that if I ever have an extra minute to knit, I have it ready to go.

The bags are super easy to construct, and can be worn around the wrist while walking, playing with the kids at the playground, or enjoying times with friends. The bag can have the yarn drawn right up through the top opening, which allows the project to be taken in and out, or the yarn can be drawn through the hole that we make in the side. The tutorial below shows you how to make a crazy simple drawstring bag with the addition of the side opening. Once you know how you want to use it, you can decide which way to put your yarn in.

Wristlet Yarn Bag for Knitting or Crochet

Materials

1 Fat quarter or small piece of fabric
Rotary mat and cutter
Quilting ruler that measure at least 18″ long
Sewing machine
Needles and thread
Sewing supplies
Ribbon or cording for the drawstring
Yarn for your knitting project

Knitting-Bag1 Knitting-Bag-Tutorial-1-copy Knitting-Bag-Tutorial-2-copyDirections

:: Wash and iron your fabric. Cut your fabric into a 18″long x 10″ wide piece of fabric. Fold down the fabric on each 18″ side by 1/4″ and iron. Fold and press both 10″ sides by 1″. Top stitch each short side in order to hold your drawstring ribbon and cord.
:: Fold your fabric right sides together and pin. Beginning on the right side of the fabric, sew around one side and the bottom (beginning under the drawstring sleeve), ending 2″ up the left hand side. Back stitch to secure your work. Leave 2″ of open, and begin sewing the sides of the bag together again, stopping just before the drawstring sleeve once again. Backstitch to secure.  Trim your corners and excess thread, clip your corners, turn right side out and press.
:: Using a safety pin, draw your ribbon or cord through your drawstring sleeve and tie off to your desired length. Place your yarn through the side hole, or simply thread it through the opening on the bag, and taking your knitting or crochet wherever you go!

AsleepNow that we have the knitting down, lets get to the reading. In the final edition of ROTH, I had the pleasure to interview a local up and coming children’s book author who was trying to fund her first book through Kickstarter. Marissa Bloom was taking her first book from inside her head, to fully illustrated, to self-published and now, distributed. Over the weekend I had the joy of picking up two copies from Marissa, and my family is in love with it. All Are Family is a sweet book about the many different types of family that are found not only around the globe, but in our own communities.

As part of my Kickstarter donation, I received a second signed copy from Marissa, and I would really like to share it with one of you. I think that every family should have this book on their shelves, and every child a chance to read it. If you are interested in winning a copy of All Are Family, simply leave a comment here and I will draw a winner on Sunday evening through the random number generator.

Winner chosen by random generator (#11). Little Blue Dragonfly Baby knits are just the yummiest!!! Adorable! And I really love the yarn bag. I’m going to have to give that a try. Thank you for the tutorial! :).

I love to see see someone living their dream and making things happen. It gives me hope that when I tell my children that they can be anything that they want, they can grow up to be just that.

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Art Bag #8

This easy and quick sewing project has been a favorite of mine since it first appeared in Rhythm of the Home so many seasons ago, and this year I wold like to surprise each of my boys with a new Art and Activity bag for their individual supplies and needs. I am thinking that perhaps we need to embroider their names on the top, just to keep the peace and the organization in check. I also plan to add in a heavy duty interfacing to make this bag a bit more sturdy than in the past. I have learned that these rough and tumble boys of mine need all the heavy duty gear we can give them, no matter what they are using.

As a work at home mother who homeschools her little ones, I am often asked what keeps us organized, and our days flowing. One thing that I really could not survive without is organizational bags and holders that keeps the materials that we need for any given project close at hand.

With four kiddos ranging in age from 10 to 4 months, I have tried to come up with ways that each kiddo can start to be more in control of what they are doing, wearing, and eating, but without the chaotic mess of throwing their clothes all over the floor, or spilling an entire box of cereal. I decided that each of their chairs, both in their homeschooling room as well as at our kitchen table, needed a bag on the back  to hold the supplies for any activity that they might be moving into.

The Art and Activity bag is designed to hold anything from a place mat, napkin and silver wear, to drawing pads, paints and brushes. It’s purpose is to give parents the ability to choose which materials they want their children to use, and children the ability to engage in an activity, such as setting the table, with much more independence.

The construction of this bag depends solely on what type of chair that you will be using, as well as it’s exact dimensions. I will be giving the directions for the chair that we used, but I will also be adding in the additional seam allowances that you will need to modify for the size of your chair.

To start, measure the width of your chair, and the length that you would like the bag to hang at once completed. For our chair, the width was 16″, and I wanted the total drop down to be 14″. From there you will add 1″ to your width, and you will have to decide how large you would like your main pocket to be.

For our bag, we decided that we wanted the drop down to be 14″, and that we wanted the main pocket to be 10″ in length.  This gave us the dimensions of 17″x24″.

Step #1

Cut both your exterior and interior fabrics to the dimensions that match your chair (again, for us this was 17″x24″). If you would like to make this bag sturdier, for heavier materials, you will want to add in the fusible webbing of your choice, and cut it to these same dimensions.

From there, you will need to decide the size of your smaller pocket. We chose a 4″x17″ pocket to hold smaller supplies like brushes, paints and pencils. Cut the pocket out and set aside.

Next, decide on the length and types of ties that you would like to use for your bag. We chose bias tape, and measured the amount of tape that we would need in order to allow for a pretty loose tie to the chair.

Step #2

Step #3

With the right sides of the fabric together, pin your ties to the main fabrics.

Leaving a 3″ portion of the fabric not sewn, and using a 1″ seam allowance, stitch around the entire bag. Trim your corners, being careful not to cut your stitches, and trim seam allowances if needed. Turn your bag inside out and press.

Please note, if you would like your bag to be extra sturdy, I would advise at this point to add stabilizer or interfacing to your project. Choose which weight would work best, and add it in before sewing the above directions. 

Step 4

Take your smaller pocket, and fold over onto the wrong side of the fabric by a 1/2″ on each side, and press. At this point you have the choice of either attaching a decorative bias tape to the top of your small pocket, or to simply fold the top over 1/2″ and edge stitch.

Now we need to fold the main fabric up to form the large pocket (We folded our fabric up 10″),  press, and place your small pocket on top of your large pocket (right sides facing up).  Align the bottom of the smaller pocket with the bottom fold of the larger pocket (what is now the bottom of the bag), and pin the pocket in place.  Open the main fabric so that the bag is now laying flat, right sides facing you.

Step #5

Decide how many dividers you would like on your small pocket. We chose to break our pocket into thirds, and we marked accordingly using a white disappearing pen. Stitch your dividing lines to your main fabric, making sure to back stitch at the beginning and end.

Step #6

Turn the bag inside out, and using a 1/2 seam allowance, stitch around three sides of your bag, beginning in the upper right hand corner. Clip your corners, and turn the bag right side out. Using a knitting needle or chop stick, push out your corners.

At this point, you will need to fold over the side edges, just above the main pocket on both sides, and top stitch.

Trim your threads, press and enjoy!

Art Bag #6

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